A September Walk in the Valley

I went for a walk in the Valley this past weekend to try out my new camera - a Nikon D3000.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
I left the house early in the morning, but not before giving James his breakfast.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Here he is clutching Pooh Bear. Life is good with Pooh Bear.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
I'm not sure what this flower is, but it's awful purty.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
I played with the Aperture-Priority setting on the camera.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
I played with lighting.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
The hike was fun.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
I watched the birds fly through the valley, and listened to the creek below.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
I looked carefully and found mushrooms. It's that time of year when mushrooms are in abundance - my favourite time of year.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Not sure what these are, but I'd bet they're edible.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
The Rosehips are waxy and glossy in the light.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Alder (Alnus tenuifolia) female (pistillate) catkins can be eaten as a survival food - they contain a very high proportion of protein. I've got some more pictures of them from a couple of years ago.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
The kit-lens that came with it - a Nikkor 18-55mm lense took some nice close-up shots.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Not sure what kind of mushrooms these are - I don't have my mushroom book handy as I write these notes.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Purty flower.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Unusual looking moth.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Red Clover.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
The seed stalk of the biennial Mullein plant. These biennial plants will form the rosette flower the first year, and the stem emerges on the second year. With Mullein, you can eat the root in the first year, but it loses starches and gets quite fibrous in the second year.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Crab Apples.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Thistle.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Thistle.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
I believe this is a Dryad's Saddle (Polyporus squamosus). I don't see a lot of the 'feathering' on the surface that I see with more mature growths, but am pretty sure this polypore is one.
"The mushroom's shape and lateral stem make it look suitable for woodland spirits, the dryads of Greek mythology, to ride."
The young polypore (note the pores comprising the yellowish-white underside of the fruiting body) fungus is soft and white on the inside, not unlike a puffball. It is edible, and you can fry it up in butter for a nice snack or bake it and add to a casserole or lasagna. As it gets older (and bigger of course), they get bitter and tough.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Unknown gilled mushroom. Note the campanulate (bell-shaped) cap.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Purty flowers.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Soft Puffball Lycoperdon molle. Edible when flesh is white.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Soft Puffball Lycoperdon molle. Molle means soft.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Apples from old apple trees that grow in amongst the Pine - remnants of an orchard that existed in the 1930s and 1940s.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Rose Hips.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Water in the valley.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
The edges are slowly wearing away, the path will collapse in a couple of years. Observe the tree above, with the roots made visible from the undermining of the earth.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
This pine has partially collapsed due to undermining of the root ball.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
A great view of the Conservation Area's woods.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Wild Carrot flower (Queen Anne's Lace), in front of Rose Hips.
"Wild carrot, bishop's lace, or Queen Anne's lace (Daucus carota) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to temperate regions of Europe and southwest Asia; domesticated carrots are cultivars of a subspecies, Daucus carota subsp. sativus.

Daucus carota is a variable biennial plant, usually growing up to 1 m tall and flowering from June to August. The umbels are claret-coloured or pale pink before they open, then bright white and rounded when in full flower, measuring 3-7cm wide with a festoon of bracts beneath; finally, as they turn to seed, they contract and become concave like a bird's nest. This has given the plant its British common or vernacular name, Bird's Nest. Very similar in appearance to the deadly Water Hemlock, it is distinguished by a mix of bi-pinnate and tri-pinnate leaves, fine hairs on its stems and leaves, a root that smells like carrots, and occasionally a single dark red flower in its center."
A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Horse Mushroom Agaricus arvensis - Edible, excellent.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Horse Mushroom Agaricus arvensis.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Horse Mushroom Agaricus arvensis (which I have written about before) in foreground, with Giant Puffballs Calvatia gigantea behind.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Giant Puffball Calvatia gigantea Edible when still white and firm, good.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Giant Puffball Calvatia gigantea Edible when still white and firm, good. Snickers Bar placed on top for scale.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Thistle.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Second Year growth of Mullein.

A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Weeping Willow (Salix alba).
"Hippocrates wrote in the 5th century BC about a bitter powder extracted from willow bark that could ease aches and pains and reduce fevers. This remedy is also mentioned in texts from ancient Egypt, Sumer, and Assyria. The Reverend Edmund Stone, a vicar from Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire, England, noted in 1763 that willow bark was effective in reducing a fever. The bark is often macerated in ethanol to produce a tincture.

The active extract of the bark, called salicin, after the Latin name Salix, was isolated to its crystalline form in 1828 by Henri Leroux, a French pharmacist, and Raffaele Piria, an Italian chemist, who then succeeded in separating out the acid in its pure state. Salicylic acid, like aspirin, is a chemical derivative of salicin."
A Walk in the Valley - September 5, 2010
Red Tailed Hawk circling above, looking for a snack of a mouse or a pigeon.

Cheers,

Mungo

Are you subscribed to the Mungo Says Bah! RSS feed yet? If not - you know what to do...

You can also follow my tweets at @MungoBah

Most Popular Posts